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First overhead bridge. Z.W. Lafon, 711 N. Kana St. Z.W. Lafon last man on right, section foreman and assistant road master.
Two miners drill holes prior to placing charges. 'Holes are bored at proper intervals for shooting.'
Two miners operate a cutting machine. 'Credit must be given to Willaim Vandivert, 21 East Tenth St., New York 3, N.Y., Not to be reproduced without written liscense.'
A very large cutting machine being operated by a miner. 'Credit must be given to William Vandivert, Not to be reproduced without written liscense.
Three miners hard at work as coal comes down a conveyor.  Copyright Photo by William Vandivert, 21 East Tenth Street, New York 3, N. Y.
Caption on back reads, 'Making a cut in the coal face is this Mastodon of the machine age - an underground cutter.  Rubber tired for mobility, and mounting a 9-foot cutting blade armed with whirring steel bits, it can cut a full 360 degree arc.  This and similar machines give America's bituminous coal mines almost unlimited capacity for production.'
Men riding in coal cars along snow covered tracks to the Skelton mine during winter time.  Miner's homes and wood piles visible.
Two miners working to support the roof in the Itmann Coal Co. mine. <br /><br />
Two miners work with a cutting machine at Pursglove No. 15.
Miner works with cutting machine at Jamison No. 9 mine.
Miners at work. 'Mountaineer Coal Co., Division of Consolidation Coal Co.'
Two dogs harnessed to coal carts. About 1890, Ohio Coal Mine. This photograph is the property of Pittsburgh Consolidation Coal Co.
Miners sit and stand outside of the New River Coal Company Prudence No. 1 Mine located 4 miles from Thurmond, Fayette County, W. Va. '1906 or after.'
'This very coarse lumpy mine run coal is the result of proper shooting. The miner is paid on a tonnage basis for loading this coal into mine cars. He is required to watch his coal carefully as he loads it and see that no impurities become mixed with the coal.'
Miner operating a loading machine outside of a mine.
Miners in cars about to go down to the pit.  Photograph courtesy of the Farm Security Administration.
Miners drill two or more holes into coal to place the explosive charges.
Group Portrait of miners. Left: Dean Holland, Ernest Nesius (VP), Harry Hoflin (VP), Roman  Verhoalen (Dean of Extension), John Golay (Provost)
Miners on the K. G. J. & E. tunnel construction crew stand at the tunnel entrance between Mt. Hope and Pax, W. Va.
Miner running a continuous mining machine.
Two miners work with a machine to undercut coal.
Photo from WVU College of Mineral and Energy Resources Scrapbook.
A photograph of coal miners working in a mine. 'Island Creek Coal Sales Co., Cincinnati, Ohio; The following cars of Pocahontas coal were shipped today for account of; 4-Point Pocahontas Coal'
'West Virginia coal miners entering 'the bowels of the earth' to produce fuel for the defense of the Nation.  The State supplies more than a quarter of the Nation's total production of coal.' Courtesy of W. Va. Dept of Labor.
Miner putting bolts into the roof of a mine for support.
Miner using a 11 BU loading machine at Jamison No. 9. Stonega Coke and Coal.
'All White Oak mines are electrically equipped and of course this mining machine is operated by electricity. The machine is mounted and transported on a specially designed truck and moves under its own power from one working place to another. It is taken from the truck by the machine operator and his helper and moved to the place of the coal and place in cutting position as you see it in this picture. The machine consists of an endless chain with 'bits' inserted, which act as cutters. The machine cuts a 'kerf' or hole along the bottom of the coal about 4 inches high and extending back six feet under the coal. The fine coal made by this machine is what is commonly known as 'bug dust.' Cutting machines are operated at night and each machine is capable of cutting twenty places on each shift. These machines are operated on tonnage basis and these operators earn high wages.'
Miner waiting for shuttle car to be loaded.
Pittsburgh Consolidation Coal Company mine.<br />
Two miners digging coal in mine.
Miner placing boards in Cavalier Mine No. 206.
A miner works on a piece of machinery on the interior of the mine. John Williams, Coal Life Project.
A miner shovels coal into a car for removal from the mine.
Two miners work on putting in roof bolts in the Pittsburgh Seam. Timber jack used to hold the roof while bolting.
Two miners work on filling up a coal tram car. John Williams, Coal Life Project.
A miner is driving a battery powered shuttle car that is self unloading to the loading station.
Two miners take samples of coal.
Miners using a cutting machine at Mine 32, Consolidation Coal Co.
Miner putting bolts into the roof of a mine for support.
A miner moves a fully loaded shuttle car down the mine shaft.
Miners operating a cutting machine.
Miners stand next to a large locomotive at Jamison No. 9.
A miner is operating a cutting machine at the Price Hill Colliery Co. mine
Two miners drill before placing charges.
Man walking on a train track beside two other tracks with coal cars on them.
Miner works at unloading a shuttle car into an elevator.
Miner stands on pile of coal ready to be loaded and sent out of mine.
Miner working on a wall in a coal mine with a pick axe.
'A very small cutting machine or a v.m. drilling machine. Probably a cutting machine'
Miners talking while others run drilling equipment.
Miner using a very small cutting machine.
Group of miners attempt to realign the wheels of a coal car with the tracks in the mine. John Williams, Coal Life Project
Miner shoveling coal as it pours into a coal car.
Miner placing boards down near coal seam at Cavalier Mine No. 206.
A Joy 10 RU preparing to cut US Royal Cable at Jamison No. 9.  Stonega Coke and Coal.
An 11BU loading machine and a Joy Shuttle car at Jamison No. 9.  Stonega Coke and Coal.
Miner drilling a hole for explosives at the Bishop Mine, Pocahontas Fuel Co.
Two miners at work drilling into a wall of coal. John Williams, Coal Life Project.
Miner operating a Joy loading machine.
'This miner has just completed loading a mine car of weighing net about two and one-half tons, and is waiting for a locomotive to come along and take it out and give him another empty car. An industrious miner will load about six and sometimes eight of these cars in one day. This is a wooden mine car that is now being rapidly replaced by steel mine car equipment. The number of post shown in this picture indicate again the immense amount of timber required to conduct operations in a safe manner.'
Miners on an electric locomotive used in hauling mine cars.
Miners and filled coal cars at the Scale House, Crane Creek Mine.
Miner carrying a large piece of wood.
Miner operating a Joy continuous mining machine.
Miners and a man in a suit pose for a portrait with a mine locomotive.
Man tests for gas at the Jamison No. 9 Mine.
A miner watches as coal is loaded into mine cars from a shuttle car.
'Interior mine scene shows men using the lard oil miner's lamp and the use of horses as well as mules. New England Mine.'
Two miners cut coal at Pursglove No. 15
'Shuttle Cars: Here are pictured loaded and empty shuttle cars sometimes called buggies. Note the noveyor on the bottom of the empty car for unloading the coal at a central loading station, into the mine cars. This equipment is propelled by huge batteries or electric cable and of course requires no track. Track-mounted mechanical loaders load directly into the mine car.'
Miner operating a loading machine.
Miner tests for gas in mine.
A miner empties his shuttle car.
Group portrait of miners standing with horses in a mine.
'All White Oak mines are electrically equipped and of course this mining machine is operated by electricity. The machine is mounted and transported on a specially designed truck and moves under its own power from one working place to another. It is taken from the truck by the machine operator and his helper and moved to the place of the coal and placed in cutting position as you see in this picture. The machine consists of an endless chain with bits inserted, which act as cutters. The machine cuts a kerf or hole along the bottom of the coal about 4 feet and extending back six feet under the coal. The fine coal made by this machine is what is commonly known as bug dust. Cutting machines are operated at night and each machine is capable of cutting twenty places on each shift. These machines are operated on tonnage basis and these operators earn high wages.'
Miner works at the control panel at Jamison No. 9.