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You searched for: Projects West Virginia History OnView Remove constraint Projects: West Virginia History OnView Topical Subjects Coal Mines and Mining--Mine Interiors. Remove constraint Topical Subjects: Coal Mines and Mining--Mine Interiors.
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Miners and filled coal cars inside a mine.
Miners talking while others run drilling equipment.
Coal carts on tracks and corridor openings in an underground mine in Monongalia County.
Mechanic's pit provides location to work on mine haulage equipment;
'Modified Longwall Mining with a German Coal Planer. Progress Report 2: Completion of Mining in three Adjacent Panels in the Pocahontas No. 4 Coal Bed, Helen, W. Va.'If this photograph is used for publication, please give credit to the Bureau of Mines, United States, Department of Interior.
'Modified Longwall Mining with a German Coal Planer. Progress Report 2: Completion of Mining in three Adjacent Panels in the Pocahontas No. 4 Coal Bed, Helen, W. Va.' If this photograph is used for publication, please give credit to the Bureau of Mines, United States, Department of Interior.
'All white oak mines work the same seam of coal, viz: Sewall. THe face of one of the working places or rooms is shown in this picture. The coal averages about 48 to 50 inches in thickness. This working place is now ready to be cut by the undercutting machine, so it can be shot down be the miner and loaded into cars for transportation to the tipple. The white line on the roof in this picture is the center line of the room set by the engineers to guide the men operating the mining machine in driving the room straight.'
Large chunks of coal piled below the seam.
Notice the preparatory cut and the 3 charge-holes near floor of the mine.
'Probably no phase of coal preparation requires the supervision and care that must be given to shooting practices. The type of explosive used is a safety powder known as "Duobel" and has been selected because it is most suitable for the coal mined in the White Oak Mines. Not only must the explosive be of the best quality and best suited for the work of breaking down the coal, but its use must be supervised and restricted. The proper amount to use; the size of the cartridge; the manner of tamping and many other details are looked after so that a maximum of lump and coarse coal is produced after shooting. This view shows the working place after the 'breaker shot' has been fired.'
'Probably no phase of coal preparation requires the supervision and care that must be given to shooting practices. The type of explosive used is a safety powder known as "Duobel" and has been selected because it is most suitable for the coal mined in the White Oak Mines. Not only must the explosive be of the best quality and best suited for the work of breaking down the coal, but its use must be supervised and restricted. The proper amount to use; the size of the cartridge; the manner of tamping and many other details are looked after so that a maximum of lump and coarse coal is produced after shooting. This view shows the working place after the 'breaker shot' has been fired.'
Print possibly overexposed.
Looking down a mine shaft.
Miner works on pile of shot down coal.
J.P. McGee, Acting Research Director, and Jack Smith, in Charge of the Gas Turbine Development Project discuss proper positioning of the turbine rotor in its casing.
'This miner has just completed loading a mine car of weighing net about two and one-half tons, and is waiting for a locomotive to come along and take it out and give him another empty car. An industrious miner will load about six and sometimes eight of these cars in one day. This is a wooden mine car that is now being rapidly replaced by steel mine car equipment. The number of post shown in this picture indicate again the immense amount of timber required to conduct operations in a safe manner.'
'White Oak preparation begins when the machine leaves and the miner is ready to shoot down his coal. The shooting inspector on the left has not only located the hole for the miner to drill, but instructed him as to what angle he must bore his hole to contain the necessary explosive used in dislodging the coal from the seam. The "kerf" made by cutting machine is plainly visible in this picture and you will note the cutting or "bug dust" have been removed before the coal is shot. The length of the auger used by the miner and the width of the bit which determines the size of the hole bored, is also carefully regulated.'
'Note the wooden mine car. It is of the Barnestown shaft which was the first shaft, of 100 feet in depth, in the valley.'
Miners using a machine to bolt the mine roof.
Two miners operating a loading machine.
Coal car tracks inside of the mine.
Shows timber roof-support and mine railway track.
Overcast, where two air currents cross in a mine, at the Jamison Mine No. 9 shaft bottom.
Controls at the Jamison No. 9 Mine.
Controls at the Jamison No. 9 Mine.
Controls at the Jamison No. 9 Mine.
Mine car traveling through the mine.
Jamison No. 9 Mine shaft with a tensioning device on a cable.