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Men standing in front of a Virginia Torpedo Co. wagon carrying nitro-glycerin. From Grant's Photo.  Record of West Virginia.
'Harrison County, Formed, 1784, from Monongalia. It included all or parts of 17 other counties.  Named for Benjamin Harrison, signer of Declaration of Independence and the governor of Virginia, 1781-84.  Birthplace of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.'
At home in Simpson Creek.
Vance, a 15 years old trapper boy, whose job it was to open and closed the door, allowing mine trains to enter and exit. Vance earned $1.60 a week.
The church was organized in 1795; the present building was built in 1899 and dedicated in 1901.
The church was organized in 1805. The first meeting house was a log cabin which was later replaced as the church grew.  The current building was built in 1871 and then rebuilt after a fire in the 1880s. The church contributed to the founding of Salem College in 1888.
The Evangelical United Brethren church was organized in 1854.The caption written on the back of the image reads:"First row of adults, left to right: A.J. Summers, retired M.E. Minister; Rev. Donald Lockhart - the pastor in 1955; Dr. J.L. Miles E.U.B. Conference Superintendent in 1955.Just behind and to the left are two former pastors of our church, left to right: Paul Brake, Rev. E.A. Crites of Bridgeport, W. Va."
The church was organized in 1783. The current church was built in 1928.  In 1787 the  trial of Rhoda Ward for witchcraft was held at the church among other trials.
The church was founded in 1805.
The church was organized in 1848. It was for many years called First Baptist Church of Clarksburg and services were held in the courthouse until a church building was dedicated in 1853.
The church was organized in 1822.
The church was organized in 1846.
Bethany (Tenmile) Baptist Church was founded in 1843.  The church was originally located near Trousers Leg Run on Tenmile creek, but later moved to Brown when the survey for a railroad ran through the building.
The church was organized in 1840.  In 1912 the church moved from Tunnel Hill to Tenmile creek near Bristol.
The church was organized in 1847.  The original members of the church were the charter members and they were: Jane Strother, Sanford Strother, Andrew Lyons, Lavina Lyons, Rachael Hooper, John Strother, and Fannie Frances Strother, and David Herbert.
The church was organized in 1848. The church is at the Mouth of Little Rock Camp (Olive Community).
The church was organized in approximately 1836.  It was Methodist Protestant originally but is now a Methodist church.
New Bethel Methodist Church was organized between 1784 and 1786.  The church burned in 1942.  The church then met in the community hall until August 1948. Money was raised and the present stone church was eventually built.
New Bethel Methodist Church was organized between 1784 and 1786.  The church burned in 1942.  The church then met in the community hall until August 1948. Money was raised and the present stone church was dedicated in 1948.
The church was organized in 1834 in Johnstown, six miles east of Lost Creek.  The present building was erected in 1856.
Smith Chapel in the Simpson Creek Community was organized in 1859.
The church was organized in 1855 in the Ten Mile District.  The original church had to relocated to clear the way for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.
The church was organized in 1858.  The original church burned in 1855 and the present church was built in 1858.
The Methodist Episcopal church was founded in 1861. Services were held in a Tannery building until 1866 when the first church was built.  The corner stone for the new church was laid in 1926.
The building was erected in 1856.  The church was once called the Ebinezer Methodist Episcopal Church, but is now known as the Sycamore Methodist Church and is part of the West Milford Circuit.
The church was organized in 1821 and the current building was constructed in 1853.
A group of boys and girls are dressed in costume. Subjects unidentified.
The girls camp poses outside of a building for a group photo. Subjects unidentified.
A boy watches as his two companions play their string instruments. Subjects unidentified.
The girl, who is unidentified, smiles as she pulls a flower from the water.
4-H campers prepare stools during their class activities. Subjects unidentified.
The royal court is pictured on a lawn stage. Subjects unidentified.
A young girl and woman making earrings. Subjects unidentified.
A group of unidentified boys participate in kitchen activities.
Two women supervise as three young girls paint bracelets. Subjects unidentified.
A group of campers work together during the class activity. Subjects unidentified.
A group of campers make lamps during their class activity.
A group of female campers produce trays during their class activity. Subjects unidentified.
A girl tries on a hand-made belt while her companions weave threads together. Subjects unidentified.
A group of unidentified girls sit behind sewing machines as they work through their class activity.
Photo of Native American inscriptions inside of a cave.
Photo of Native American inscriptions inside of a cave.
Photo of Native American inscriptions inside of a cave.
An unidentified man looks into a cave that contains Native American cave writings.
View of a cave from the outside which holds Native American cave writings.
A group of boys play football while their classmates watch from behind. The school was a one room school located on the Post family farm in Harrison County, W. Va.