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You searched for: Geographic Names Harpers Ferry (W. Va.)--History--John Brown's Raid, 1859. Remove constraint Geographic Names: Harpers Ferry (W. Va.)--History--John Brown's Raid, 1859. Projects West Virginia History OnView Remove constraint Projects: West Virginia History OnView
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The U.S. Army Buildings which John Brown took possession of. Harpers Ferry, W. VA. Junction of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers. Meeting of the States of MD., W. VA., and VA.  Arsenal captured, October 16, 1859.
Drawing of the hanging of John Brown at Charles Town, Jefferson County, West Virginia, approximately 12 miles from the site of his raid at Harpers Ferry.
John Brown's fort, the Engine House of the U. S. Arsenal in Harpers Ferry, W. Va.
A woman reads the historic markers next to a monument to John Brown's Fort in Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 'Muriel V. Self."
'The home of Colonel Lewis Washington, great-great nephew of General George Washington.  During John Brown's raid in 1859, Colonel Washington was taken from Beall Air as a Hostage.'
Close up view of John Brown's Fort at Harpers Ferry, W. Va.
'The present site of John Brown's Fort as it now stands in a field overlooking the Shenandoah River in Va., a few miles from where it originally stood at Harpers Ferry.  It was placed here at the suggestion of Kate Field of Washington, after it had been exhibited at the Worlds Fair in Chicago.'  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 7514 for more information.
'A postcard view of the Fire Engine House used as fort by John Brown, Harpers Ferry; No objection to reproducing or publishing this picture provided credit line 'Photo by U.S. Army Signal Corps' appears on the photograph or page. Permission must be obtained from the War Department if it is desired for use in commerical advertising.'
Fort building stands in a field where two children are playing in the foreground. Inscription with the image, 'The present site of John Brown's Fort as it now stands in a field overlooking the Shenandoah River, in [West] Virginia, a few miles from where it originally stood at Harper's Ferry.  It was placed here at the request of Kate Field, of Washington after it was exhibited at the World's Fair in Chicago.'
John Brown's Fort was used to store fertilizer in 1909.
'In 1859 John Brown, Kansas Abolitionist, and a part of followers seized this little engine house which was at the time serving as a government arsenal at Harpers Ferry, W. Va.  The fort was dismantled in 1892 and shipped to the Columbian Exposition at Chicago, Ill.  It was later returned to Harpers Ferry, where it is now being used as a museum on the campus of Storer College. This picture is an opposite side view of John Brown's Fort.'  After this description was written and Storer College closed, the fort was moved back to the lower town near its original site.
'In 1859 John Brown, Kansas Abolitionist, and a part of followers seized this little engine house which was at the time serving as a government arsenal at Harpers Ferry, W. Va.  The fort was dismanteled in 1892 and shipped to the Columbian Exposition at Chicago, Ill.  It was laterreturned to Harpers Ferry, where it is now being used as a museum on the compus of Storer College. This picture is an opposite side view of John Brown's Fort.' 'From the West Virginia Industrial and Publicity Commission, State Capitol, Charleston 5, W. Va.'
Pictured during the great snow of March 7, 8, 9, 1941.
This is the site of the U.S. Arsenal captured by John Brown October 16th 1859.
John Brown's Fort in the background.
View of Harper's Ferry showing the old engine house called John Brown's Fort