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World War I era airplane landing gear lined up in a hangar.
Candid portrait of Lt. Louis Bennett in uniform posing with a small child on a sled.
The aircraft in the picture is a Curtiss Jenny.  Records show that the tail number (#1) corresponds to an aircraft that had a mishap enroute to West Virginia, and was destroyed in a crash on August 4, 1917.  In this crash Cadet C.B. Lambert (of Welch, West Virginia) was killed, and Lieutenant William Frey was injured.  (See newspaper Wheeling Register, August 4, 1917.)
Officers of the West Virginia Flying Corps, including (left to right) Lieutenant Thomas Kent, Captain Louis Bennett, Jr., and Lieutenant William Frey.  They are standing in front of a Curtiss JN or "Jenny" aircraft.  This photograph appeared with an article regarding the W. Va. Flying Corps in the July 29, 1917 issue of the Wheeling Sunday News on page eight of part iii.
Preparing to start aircraft #1 Curtiss JN-4 and "grass cutter" training plane. Plane #1 was destroyed in a crash on August 4, 1917.  In this crash Cadet C.B. Lambert (of Welch, West Virginia) was killed, and Lieutenant William Frey was injured.  (See newspaper Wheeling Register, August 4, 1917.)  Each ground crewman in the picture is about to "turn over the prop" in order to start the engines of the airplanes.
Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr. and dog standing in front of S. E. 5a airplane.
Postcard portrait of Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr.
Postcard portrait of Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr.
Postcard of interior of field hospital, German Red Cross Number 40, at Wavrin, France.  This was the hospital where Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr. passed away on August 24, 1918 while his wounds were being dressed after his plane was shot down.   Richard Lavril [sic] Ulffz is shown at center.  Postcard came with letter from Mlle. Madelien Dallenne to Sallie Maxwell Bennett, 14 July 1919. Bennett Collection Box 3, Folder 2.
Portrait of Jarvis Offutt and Lt. Louis Bennett.  At left is Jarvis Jenness Offutt of the U.S. Air Sevice, who was temporarily attached to Number 56 Aero Squadron of the R.A.F. He was killed in an accident in France, August 13, 1918.  He was from Nebraska and a classmate of Bennett at Yale.
Portrait of Jarvis Offutt and Lt. Louis Bennett.  At left is Jarvis Jenness Offutt of the U.S. Air Sevice, who was temporarily attached to Number 56 Aero Squadron of the R.A.F. He was killed in an accident in France, August 13, 1918.  He was from Nebraska and a classmate of Bennett at Yale.
Portrait of Jarvis Offutt and Lt. Louis Bennett.  At left is Jarvis Jenness Offutt of the U.S. Air Sevice, who was temporarily attached to Number 56 Aero Squadron of the R.A.F. He was killed in an accident in France, August 13, 1918.  He was from Nebraska and a classmate of Bennett at Yale.
Portrait of Jarvis Offutt and Lt. Louis Bennett.  At left is Jarvis Jenness Offutt of the U.S. Air Sevice, who was temporarily attached to Number 56 Aero Squadron of the R.A.F. He was killed in an accident in France, August 13, 1918.  He was from Nebraska and a classmate of Bennett at Yale.  This photograph was found in Bennett's Royal Air Force wallet.
Friends of Louis Bennett, Jr. sitting on a trunk.  This photograph was found in Bennett's Royal Air Force wallet.  Back of photo says, 'Lou - here you have the picture Bliss took wish you had been in it.  Am ferrying now with H.B [?] at American Officers Inn, London. - Jarvis
See Mary Hays letter to Louis Bennett, 16 August 1918, Bennett Collection, Box 2 Folder 3.  Sopwith 'Dolphin' aircraft of No. 90 Squadron in the background.
Candid portrait of two World War I Soldiers.  This photograph was found in Louis  Bennett, Jr.'s Royal Air Force wallet.
Group of friends of Louis Bennett, Jr. stand in front of an airplane.  Names listed on back are Verity, Mordaunt, Lettice Aceland, Ottilie, and Ethel Mills.  Portrait of Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr., R.F.C.  This photograph, as well as others (numbers 001378, 001379, and 001380) are referenced in a letter from Mrs. Ethel Mills to Mrs. Louis Bennett, Sr. The text of the letter is as follows: August 20, 1919 Drokes, Beaulieu, Hants My Dear Mrs. Bennett, I just want to reach across the channel, and take your hand and hold it, in a great understanding silence! To begin with, you could not have had my address if your dear boy had not given it!  I hope you will be coming to England [and] will come to us for a few days.  And get to know his old surroundings here -- where he lived [and] bunked.  I remember I was at work building a pig stye! -- when suddenly he appeared flying round [and] round my house and suddenly he made the most beautiful desent [sic] and stood before us, with his handsome face glowing, 'I’ve come to say good bye' -- he could only stay for ½ an hour -- and we mutually photographed each other -- then he was gone, saying 'I’ll send back my photo for you all to sign.'  He had no sooner gone, than I grieved I hadn’t asked him for your address, so as to send you any of ours that might be good, as I knew how you’d love to have as many snapshots as possible, but hoped I’d soon hear from him.  Well at last I did write -- the photo I had to wait sometime to get a signature -- [and] something made me write to him without returning him his [and] ours --  fearing he had moved from his last address -- so I said do tell me if this reaches you before I send the precious photos.'  And I waited, [and] as time passed, I feared he had gone to join with those other warriors!  Then came the trying to find you, [and] send you these precious snapshots. [and] so when I saw your envelope, before I opened it, or had even turned it round, I knew what its contents must be [and] I just felt greatful that evidently he looked upon us as friends, [and] so had given you my name and address.  You will let me see you should you come to England won’t you -- [and] if possible you will come down to Bealieu [and] be with us for a little while. I will not write more tonight -- but with true love [and] the deepest sympathy to Mr. Bennett and yourself. Yours affectionately Ethel Mills You will want his letter too.  You will see the fine way he agitated to get to France and to be fighting!
Louis Bennett, center, stands among friends next to airplane.  Names listed on back are Ethel Mills, Mordaunt, Ottilie, and Verity.  Portrait of Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr., R.F.C.  This photograph, as well as others (numbers 001378, 001379, and 001380) are referenced in a letter from Mrs. Ethel Mills to Mrs. Louis Bennett, Sr. The text of the letter is as follows: August 20, 1919 Drokes, Beaulieu, Hants My Dear Mrs. Bennett, I just want to reach across the channel, and take your hand and hold it, in a great understanding silence! To begin with, you could not have had my address if your dear boy had not given it!  I hope you will be coming to England [and] will come to us for a few days.  And get to know his old surroundings here -- where he lived [and] bunked.  I remember I was at work building a pig stye! -- when suddenly he appeared flying round [and] round my house and suddenly he made the most beautiful desent [sic] and stood before us, with his handsome face glowing, 'I’ve come to say good bye' -- he could only stay for ½ an hour -- and we mutually photographed each other -- then he was gone, saying 'I’ll send back my photo for you all to sign.'  He had no sooner gone, than I grieved I hadn’t asked him for your address, so as to send you any of ours that might be good, as I knew how you’d love to have as many snapshots as possible, but hoped I’d soon hear from him.  Well at last I did write -- the photo I had to wait sometime to get a signature -- [and] something made me write to him without returning him his [and] ours --  fearing he had moved from his last address -- so I said do tell me if this reaches you before I send the precious photos.'  And I waited, [and] as time passed, I feared he had gone to join with those other warriors!  Then came the trying to find you, [and] send you these precious snapshots. [and] so when I saw your envelope, before I opened it, or had even turned it round, I knew what its contents must be [and] I just felt greatful that evidently he looked upon us as friends, [and] so had given you my name and address.  You will let me see you should you come to England won’t you -- [and] if possible you will come down to Bealieu [and] be with us for a little while. I will not write more tonight -- but with true love [and] the deepest sympathy to Mr. Bennett and yourself. Yours affectionately Ethel Mills You will want his letter too.  You will see the fine way he agitated to get to France and to be fighting!
Louis Bennett, Jr. shows his plane to two young ladies, identified on the back of the photo as Lettice Aceland and Ottilie. Portrait of Lt. Louis Bennett, Jr., R.F.C.  This photograph, as well as others (numbers 001378, 001379, and 001380) are referenced in a letter from Mrs. Ethel Mills to Mrs. Louis Bennett, Sr. The text of the letter is as follows: August 20, 1919 Drokes, Beaulieu, Hants My Dear Mrs. Bennett, I just want to reach across the channel, and take your hand and hold it, in a great understanding silence! To begin with, you could not have had my address if your dear boy had not given it!  I hope you will be coming to England [and] will come to us for a few days.  And get to know his old surroundings here -- where he lived [and] bunked.  I remember I was at work building a pig stye! -- when suddenly he appeared flying round [and] round my house and suddenly he made the most beautiful desent [sic] and stood before us, with his handsome face glowing, 'I’ve come to say good bye' -- he could only stay for ½ an hour -- and we mutually photographed each other -- then he was gone, saying 'I’ll send back my photo for you all to sign.'  He had no sooner gone, than I grieved I hadn’t asked him for your address, so as to send you any of ours that might be good, as I knew how you’d love to have as many snapshots as possible, but hoped I’d soon hear from him.  Well at last I did write -- the photo I had to wait sometime to get a signature -- [and] something made me write to him without returning him his [and] ours --  fearing he had moved from his last address -- so I said do tell me if this reaches you before I send the precious photos.'  And I waited, [and] as time passed, I feared he had gone to join with those other warriors!  Then came the trying to find you, [and] send you these precious snapshots. [and] so when I saw your envelope, before I opened it, or had even turned it round, I knew what its contents must be [and] I just felt greatful that evidently he looked upon us as friends, [and] so had given you my name and address.  You will let me see you should you come to England won’t you -- [and] if possible you will come down to Bealieu [and] be with us for a little while. I will not write more tonight -- but with true love [and] the deepest sympathy to Mr. Bennett and yourself. Yours affectionately Ethel Mills You will want his letter too.  You will see the fine way he agitated to get to France and to be fighting!
Telegrapher W.L.Knopp stands on right. Tower was known as "AD Cabin" and controled train movements between Ronceverte and Hinton. Twenty switches to Alderson sidings were operated here.
Group portrait of workers in front of Acme Limestone Company Plant, Ft. Spring, W. Va.
View of Limestone Plant with train engine and cars loaded with rocks.  Crew members stand throughout.
View of quarry face, showing ladders, railroad, and steam shovel, Acme Limestone Co. Ft. Spring, W.Va.
'View of Acme Limestone Company crusher and C&O siding, Ft. Spring, W. Va.'
General view of Alderson, W.Va. from Indian View on Muddy Creek Mountain.  Mountains surrounding the town of Alderson.
Interior view of restaurant in Clarksburg.  Tables on the right side and bar on the left.
View of the Administration Building of the W. Va. Industrial School for Boys in Grafton, West Virginia.
School on the top of a hill.
Standing from left to right: Ida Sutton, Anna Sutton, Elda Sutton, and Mable Sutton is the baby carriage.
Armistice parade, High Street and Willey Street in Morgantown, West Virginia. 'Jacques in center.'
Sailors march around the corner at Willey and High Streets.
Armistice Parade lined up along North High Street. Old Boughner house on right.  Torn down during the summer of 1970.
Armistice Parade taken from a window of the Davis home at High and Willey Streets in Morgantown, West Virginia.
Price Furniture and Morgantown Laundry Company.
Pictured: Lynn and Fany Conrad, Mary Hendrick, Almeda Simmons, Delia Roberson, Charley Blewitt, Roy Simmons, Clara Ruddle, Zola Simmons, Will Cunningham, Leta Ruddle, Howard Cunningham, Linda Byrd, Don Byrd, Stanley and Bessie Bowers, Ernest and __ Ruddle, __ and Jessie Ruddle.
Pictured first row, from left to right- __, __, Russ Dice, Luther Simmons.  Second row- __, __, __, Roy Ruddle.
Located near Morgantown in Monongalia County.