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Four people are standing outside a Wheeling Steel, the Musical Steelmakers, bus, in Wheeling, West Virignia.
The Rhythm Rangers were radio stars on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, which was created in 1936 by Wheeling Steel Corporation advertising executive John L. Grimes. The radio broadcast was ran and operated by company employees and family members, the first of it's kind to utilize this model. This free, live performance, at the National Cornhusking Championship in Marshall, Missouri was a way to advertise the broadcast to a broader audience as well as to promote their products to farmers in the area.
Group of musicians are likely members of the Rhythm Rangers, performers on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. This broadcast began in 1936 as a way to promote both Wheeling Steel Corporation's products and their employees who exclusively ran and performed on the broadcasts.
The group of musicians is likely the Rhythm Rangers. These musicians, like all employees of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, were either employees or family members of employees of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This radio broadcast was company advertising executive John L. Grimes idea to promote both the company's product and its employees. It began broadcasting in 1936 and ended in 1944.
These performers were likely musicians on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. This radio broadcast was created by John L. Grimes, advertising executive at Wheeling Steel Corporation. The broadcast was ran exclusively by employees and family members of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This excursion to Missouri was used to spread the name of the growing broadcast as well as to promote their products, including COP-R-LOY.
The group of musicians is likely the Rhythm Rangers. These musicians, like all employees of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, were either employees or family members of employees of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This radio broadcast was company advertising executive John L. Grimes idea to promote both the company's product and its employees. It began broadcasting in 1936 and ended in 1944.
"Tony Biacco, steelmaker from Yorkville possesses two strong hands with which he capably handles ductillite and his accordion. His appearances on the family broadcast have been highly commendable. Now a regular in orchestra in 1943."
"The Steelmakers accompany Tom Care, employee from the Steubenville Works, as he headlines with a trumpet solo. Tom played "At The End Of a Perfect Day", which appealed to a great number of Wheeling Steel's nation-wide family."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Here's the same quintet on Sunday, running over a number before air time. Lew Davies is the conductor of the program's 23 piece orchestra of mill, plant, and office workers."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Part of Regina Colbert's lunch hour is devoted to catching up on correspondence with service men at home and overseas. The "Singing Secretary" writes weekly to a number of men in uniform." Regina Colbert was a performer on the "It's Wheeling Steel" Radio broadcast. This broadcast was ran exclusively by Wheeling Steel Corp. employees and family members, but as the program grew in popularity they began to hire performers with professional backgrounds, like Regina Colbert. However, in order to comply with his rule of an all employee only run program, he would hire these professionals to work in the offices for a period of time. In Colbert's case, she was hired to work as a secretary in the advertising department.
The Wheeling Musical Steelmakers were a group that would regularly perform on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, created in 1936 by John L. Grimes who wanted to promote both Wheeling Steel Corporations products and their employees. John Wisvari's day job was a pipe-threader at the Benwood Works.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. The Steel Sisters and The Musical Steelmakers were regulars on the broadcast. The Steel Sisters became so popular that they eventually left the show to tour with Horace Heidt and his orchestra. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity (as evident by the microphone stands). In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. Tom Whitley, the man hunched over, is the orchestra leader of the Musical Steelmakers of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle. All performers and crew members of the broadcast were Wheeling Steel Corporation employees or immediate family members.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity, evident on the microphone stand. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Tom Whitley, orchestra leader of the Musical Steelmakers is behind Colbert, second man in from the right. "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was started in 1936 by John L. Grimes who wanted to advertise the corporations product offerings while also promoting their employees. Throughout the entire life of the broadcast, only Wheeling Steel employees and immediate family members were allowed to participate. Including professional singers like Regina Colbert who was given a secretary position at the corporation. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Center left: Tom Whitley, orchestra leader of the Musical Steelmakers of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. Center right: Regina Colbert, singer on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program and secretary in advertising office.  In 1943 the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. The Musical Steelmakers were regular performers on the broadcast. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
From left to right: (?), Margie Greig, Regina Colbert, B.J. Evans, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, M.J. Evans, (?), Tommy Whitley, and (?). Picture taken before or after the performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "When the Musical Steelmakers are heard each Sunday, starting October 5, over at Station ___ at ___ o'clock these three pretty singers, the Steel Sisters, will help add to the gaiety and tunefulness of the programs. They are, from the left, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, and Lucille Bell. Like other members Musical Steelmakers troupe they are either employees in the steel industry or members of employee families." The first all employee broadcast. The Steel Sisters eventually gained so much recognition that they went on tour with Horace Heidt and his orchestra.
Two of the mill men share coffee, still in their work clothes, after receiving a call to come from the mill to the main office for rehearsal right away. They were preparing to go to Chicago for a war bond program. See original photograph for further description.
Picture taken of performance inside of WVU Field House, which was part of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program's "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
From left to right: (?), Margie Greig, Regina Colbert, B.J. Evans, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, M.J. Evans, (?), Tommy Whitley, and (?). Picture taken before or after the performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
From left to right: (?), Margie Greig, Regina Colbert, B.J. Evans, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, M.J. Evans, (?), Tommy Whitley, and (?). Picture taken before or after the performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken before or after the performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Molly Staten and Eleanor Bowman Lynn rehearsed several weeks on their piano duet. They are stenographers from the main office of Wheeling Steel Company." Like all performers and employees on the "It's Wheeling Steel" broadcast, all were also employees or family members of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. They were radio's first all employee only broadcast.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Music and scripts are carefully checked for audience pleasure as J.L. Grimes, general advertising manager for the Wheeling Steel Corporation (in center) and his staff hold a production confab in preparation for the return to the air October 5 of the tuneful "Wheeling Steelmakers" over the NBC-Blue Network." Production staff from left to right: Orchestra leader Tommy Whitley, Maury Longfellow, Ardenne White, Unknown, John Grimes, Unknown, Unknown.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Bill Griffiths makes military equipment during working hours, relaxes in his spare time by duplicating his day's work in miniature. he built the model guns and tanks shown here, and the train that carries them. On Sundays, he's one of the famed "Singing Millmen"." The Singing Millmen were regulars on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "For headlining appearances, auditions for mill workers and members of their immediate families are held every few weeks at the studios of WWVA. Of course, due to the standard set for our program, all that are auditioned can not be presented. The standard set is inferred to be that of the broadcasting station's, thereby relieving the corporation of discrimination."