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Grover Hawley is water tender at Benwood Works Blast Furnace.
Caption on back of postcard reads: "Eight large exhibits showed our products to the farmers." Wheeling Steel Corporation brought their family show on the road to the National Cornhusking Championship where performers on their radio broadcast played in front of the crowd, as well as to show off their extensive line of product offerings. This radio broadcast program began in 1936, 6 years after company executive John L. Grimes realized he could produce his own show at the same cost of advertising in a nationally known media. The broadcast was ran and operated entirely by Wheeling Steel Corporation employees and immediate family members, the first of its kind.
The group of musicians is likely the Rhythm Rangers. These musicians, like all employees of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, were either employees or family members of employees of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This radio broadcast was company advertising executive John L. Grimes idea to promote both the company's product and its employees. It began broadcasting in 1936 and ended in 1944.
Wheeling Steelmakers broadcast traveled to this competition to spread word about their weekly radio broadcast as well as to promote Wheeling Steel's COP-R-LOY farm fencing and other products, as seen on the signs in foreground of photograph.
Group is likely the Rhythm Rangers and it appears they are playing inside of a hotel, possibly in Marshall, Missouri during their stay for the National Cornhusking Championship, or somewhere else along the route from Wheeling, West Virginia to the competition. These musicians, like all who worked on the radio broadcast, were employees or immediate family members of the Wheeling Steel Corporation.
Wheeling Steel Corporation brought their family show on the road to the National Cornhusking Championship where performers on their radio broadcast played in front of the crowd, as well as to show off their extensive line of product offerings, including eight different displays. This radio broadcast program began in 1936, 6 years after company executive John L. Grimes realized he could produce his own show at the same cost of advertising in a nationally known media. The broadcast was ran and operated entirely by Wheeling Steel Corporation employees and immediate family members, the first of its kind.
Wheeling Corrugating Co. is a Wheeling Steel Corp. owned company of which produced their own radio broadcast called "It's Wheeling Steel" from 1936 to 1944. This broadcast was ran and operate exclusively by Wheeling Steel Corp. employees and family members, the first radio program to ever do such a thing. Wheeling Corrugating Co. brought their products to the National Cornhusking Competition to show to attending farmers. They also traveled with employee musicians to play for the crowd to help spread the word of the radio broadcast to a larger audience.
Group of musicians are likely members of the Rhythm Rangers, performers on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. This broadcast began in 1936 as a way to promote both Wheeling Steel Corporation's products and their employees who exclusively ran and performed on the broadcasts.
The group of musicians is likely the Rhythm Rangers. These musicians, like all employees of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, were either employees or family members of employees of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This radio broadcast was company advertising executive John L. Grimes idea to promote both the company's product and its employees. It began broadcasting in 1936 and ended in 1944.
These performers were likely musicians on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. This radio broadcast was created by John L. Grimes, advertising executive at Wheeling Steel Corporation. The broadcast was ran exclusively by employees and family members of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This excursion to Missouri was used to spread the name of the growing broadcast as well as to promote their products, including COP-R-LOY.
The group of musicians is likely the Rhythm Rangers. These musicians, like all employees of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, were either employees or family members of employees of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This radio broadcast was company advertising executive John L. Grimes idea to promote both the company's product and its employees. It began broadcasting in 1936 and ended in 1944.
The group of musicians is likely the Rhythm Rangers. These musicians, like all employees of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, were either employees or family members of employees of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. This radio broadcast was company advertising executive John L. Grimes idea to promote both the company's product and its employees. It began broadcasting in 1936 and ended in 1944.
Quote from a newspaper article reads: "Carolyn Lee, a successful star at four years of age, will have her own little sketch with the Old Timer who will try to induce her to sing the same song she sang with Madeleine Carroll and Fred MacMurray in the Paramount production, "Honeymoon in Bali". Wheeling's own little movie star is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Warren Copp. Mr. Copp is a ceramic engineer and is employed by the Wheeling Steel corporation. The Copp child will share headline honors with another daughter of Wheeling Steel, Miss Betty Bromelow." The Old Timer was a character on the radio broadcast who provided banter and introductions. He was played by Wheeling Steel auditor, John Winchcoll.
"Tony Biacco, steelmaker from Yorkville possesses two strong hands with which he capably handles ductillite and his accordion. His appearances on the family broadcast have been highly commendable. Now a regular in orchestra in 1943."
"Tony Biacco, steelmaker from Yorkville possesses two strong hands with which he capably handles ductillite and his accordion. His appearances on the family broadcast have been highly commendable. Now a regular in orchestra in 1943."
"The Steelmakers accompany Tom Care, employee from the Steubenville Works, as he headlines with a trumpet solo. Tom played "At The End Of a Perfect Day", which appealed to a great number of Wheeling Steel's nation-wide family."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Here's the same quintet on Sunday, running over a number before air time. Lew Davies is the conductor of the program's 23 piece orchestra of mill, plant, and office workers."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Part of Regina Colbert's lunch hour is devoted to catching up on correspondence with service men at home and overseas. The "Singing Secretary" writes weekly to a number of men in uniform." Regina Colbert was a performer on the "It's Wheeling Steel" Radio broadcast. This broadcast was ran exclusively by Wheeling Steel Corp. employees and family members, but as the program grew in popularity they began to hire performers with professional backgrounds, like Regina Colbert. However, in order to comply with his rule of an all employee only run program, he would hire these professionals to work in the offices for a period of time. In Colbert's case, she was hired to work as a secretary in the advertising department.
The Wheeling Musical Steelmakers were a group that would regularly perform on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, created in 1936 by John L. Grimes who wanted to promote both Wheeling Steel Corporations products and their employees. John Wisvari's day job was a pipe-threader at the Benwood Works.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. The Steel Sisters and The Musical Steelmakers were regulars on the broadcast. The Steel Sisters became so popular that they eventually left the show to tour with Horace Heidt and his orchestra. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity (as evident by the microphone stands). In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. Tom Whitley, the man hunched over, is the orchestra leader of the Musical Steelmakers of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle. All performers and crew members of the broadcast were Wheeling Steel Corporation employees or immediate family members.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity, evident on the microphone stand. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Tom Whitley, orchestra leader of the Musical Steelmakers is behind Colbert, second man in from the right. "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was started in 1936 by John L. Grimes who wanted to advertise the corporations product offerings while also promoting their employees. Throughout the entire life of the broadcast, only Wheeling Steel employees and immediate family members were allowed to participate. Including professional singers like Regina Colbert who was given a secretary position at the corporation. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Center left: Tom Whitley, orchestra leader of the Musical Steelmakers of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. Center right: Regina Colbert, singer on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program and secretary in advertising office.  In 1943 the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. The Musical Steelmakers were regular performers on the broadcast. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
John L. Grimes was advertising executive of Wheeling Steel Corporation and was responsible for the creation of the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast in 1936. In 1941 the show was picked up by the National Broadcasting Company's Blue Network, as it grew in popularity. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "This is what the Singing Millmen and Millmaids look like to the studio audience. The group is conducted by Lew Davies, and is composed entirely of steel workers and their families." This group was a performer on the Wheeling Steelmakers radio broadcast, which was ran entirely by Wheeling Steel Corporation employees and family members, the first all employee radio broadcast. In 1943 the show took to the road throughout several cities in West Virginia to put on "Buy a Bomber" themed shows, where the host cities were challenged to buy enough enough Defense Bonds to purchase a medium or large sized bomber. Cities who accomplished the challenge would get their name placed on the plane as it flew to battle.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the Wheeling Steelmakers radio program. The Wheeling Steelmakers radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the Wheeling Steelmakers radio program. The Wheeling Steelmakers radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the Wheeling Steelmakers radio program. The Wheeling Steelmakers radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the Wheeling Steelmakers radio program. The Wheeling Steelmakers radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the Wheeling Steelmakers radio program. The Wheeling Steelmakers radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Photo taken during the Army-Navy Award presentation inside of the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia. The presentation was broadcast on over 127 radio stations of NBC's Blue Network, including the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program. The "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast was moved to the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling, West Virginia in 1939 as production became more polished and more and more listeners tuned in.
Parade is associated with the War Bond Drive at which the Musical Steelmakers performed.
From left to right: (?), Margie Greig, Regina Colbert, B.J. Evans, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, M.J. Evans, (?), Tommy Whitley, and (?). Picture taken before or after the performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Picture taken during Wheeling Musical Steelmakers performance at WVU Field House, which was part of their "Buy a Bomber" series, where communities were challenged to buy enough Defense Bonds to purchase a bomber. The money raised in this circumstance exceeded all expectations and was the largest such fundraiser in Monongalia County, West Virginia.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "When the Musical Steelmakers are heard each Sunday, starting October 5, over at Station ___ at ___ o'clock these three pretty singers, the Steel Sisters, will help add to the gaiety and tunefulness of the programs. They are, from the left, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, and Lucille Bell. Like other members Musical Steelmakers troupe they are either employees in the steel industry or members of employee families." The first all employee broadcast. The Steel Sisters eventually gained so much recognition that they went on tour with Horace Heidt and his orchestra.