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Raymond Young from Oak Hill, W. Va., served in Europe during WW II as a combat photographer and in South Vietnam as a medical photographer.
Raymond Young from Oak Hill, W. Va. served in Europe during WWII as a combat photographer and in South Vietnam as a medical photographer.
Raymond Young served in Europe during WWII as a combat photographer and in South Vietnam as a medical photographer.
Raymond Young from Oak Hill, W. Va. is second one from the left.
Raymond Young from Oak Hill, W. Va. served in Europe during WWII as a combat photographer and in South Vietnam as a medical photographer.
Sergeant Raymond Young teaching a Dutch Officer/Captain how to use the K20 camera while Young was assigned to a NATO unit in Europe.
Raymond Young shows unidentified military personnel, including a Dutch Captain a K-20 camera. The military personel were part of a NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) unit stationed in Europe.
A rambild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Augsburg building gutted by the Allied bombing during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building after Germany was bombed in World War II.
Over its twelve years as a concentration camp, the Dachau administration recorded the intake of 206,206 prisoners and 31,951 deaths. This number varies according to the source but the totals are overwhelming regardless. Photographic evidence of the Holocaust, such as this, extinguished claims that reports of horrific Nazi Death Camps was Allied propaganda.
On April 29, 1945 Dachau was surrendered to the American Army by SS- Sturmscharfuhrer Heinrich Wicker. As U.S. troops neared the camp, they found more than 30 railroad cars filled with additional bodies brought to Dachau.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of all Allied Forces in the European Theater during World War II, is greeted by an unidentified officer. Eisenhower toured several Nazi Concentration Camps immediately after they were liberated in order to personally testify to the heinous Nazi war crimes.
Information included with the photograph,"Debris spilled from bombed buildings of Mainz fills a street of the ancient Rhine River city captured by troops of the 80th Division, Third u.S. Army, March 23, 1945. Mainz, birthplace of Johannes Gutemberg, credited with the development of printing in the 15th Century, was a strategic Nazi manufacturing center of machinery and chemicals."
U.S. Army troops pushed through German resistance in the Spring of 1945. Many towns such as this were bombed from the air and assualted by ground forces.
U.S. soldiers move on from a destroyed transport vehicle on the road as one G.I. mans a mounted machine gun in the jeep.
Information included on back: "Dead horses and wrecked vehicles of German convoy are strewn along road in vicinity of Lus, Germany. Following attack on convoy by American Dive Bombers. Germans were trying to escape from encirclement by troops of the 3rd and 7th U.S. Armies." (U.S. Signal Corps).
Part of the information included on back: "German town near Duren on the Roer River, important junction point of the road leading to Cologne and the Rhine lies shell-wrecked and bombed to ruins February 21, 1945 as U.S. troops advanced deeper into Germany."(U.S. Signal Corps).
Part of information included on back: "A knocked-out American tank stands behind a small, leveled building in captured Heilbronn. German industrial city which was virtually demolished prior to its occupation . . ." (U.S. Signal Corps).
Information on back of picture reads: "A civilian picks his way through the rubble littering the streets of Laroche, Belgium, formerly an important enemy communications center on the northern flank of the Ardonnes Salient. Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force announced January 12, 1945, that Allied troops had taken the Belgian town. Only a little over a month after the launching of the unsuccessful Nazi counter-thrust December 16, 1944, front lone correspondents made it clear by midnight January 22, 1945, that the Battle of the Ardonnes was practically over."
Caption on back of photo reads: "German woman (left) stands before the wreckage of her home and explains to a neighbor how a heavy Nazi shell leveled the building. Several civilians were injured by the enemy action against the town after its capture by American troops."
Caption on back of photo reads: "German civilians from the small farming community of Tenholz are received by an American soldier in a shattered house serving as a reception center in Lovenich. The 102nd Infantry Division of the Ninth U.S. Army captured Lovenich February 25, 1945."
Caption on back reads "Civilians of Plauen, Germany, make their way through rubble filled streets in search of what articles they can salvage from their wrecked homes and shops. The city was captured by the 3rd U.S. Army following a devastating attack by Allied bombers."
Information on back of photo reads: "Capt. Philip Staples; Ardmore, Pennsylvania enjoys a fresh made egg omelette that was presented to him by grateful French civilians who had just been liberated from German hands, near Champagne."
Information on the back of photo reads: "Infantrymen of the Fourth Armored Division, Third U.S. Army, advance through rubble in a battered street in Worms, Germany, as they clear out Nazi snipers in the captured city March 20, 1945. Worms is on the west bank of the Rhine River nine miles north of Ludwigshafen."
Caption on back of photo reads: "American infantrymen of 36th Division run through rubble littered street of battle-scarred Rohrwiller, France. Town is under enemy attack."
Information on back of photo reads: "German civilians look over the ruins of their home which was shelled by American troops in the attack on Weifall, Germany."
The photograph was most likely taken in Holland, which had been under Nazi control for several years until portions of the country was liberated by the Allies in the Fall of 1944 during Operation Market Garden.
Young, from Oak Hill, W. Va. served with 361st Engineer Special as an infantryman and combat photographer.
The photograph was taken during the Allied advance against the Nazis in Europe.
Information on back of photo reads: "Debris litters the interior of a ruined church in Germany, one of the many buildings destroyed during the bitter fighting which marked the Allied thrust into the Reich."
Information on back of photo reads: "German civilians sit with their children outside of a house in a Reich town captured by troops of the Ninth U.S. Army advancing to the Rhine River. The civilians have been lined up for questioning by an American officer. Units of the Ninth Army reached the Rhine March 2, 1945, when they captured Neuss opposite the industrial center of Dusseldorf."
Information on back of photo reads: "German civilians march through newly captured Zulpich, Germany, to receive instructions on their conduct from military government unit with 9th Infantry Division of 1st U.S. Army. Town was hard hit by U.S. bombers blasting path to Rhine."
Information on back of photo reads: "Firm contact has been established between ground forces of the First American Army and those of the Russian Army. The historic meeting took place in the town of Torgau, on the Elbe River, 75 miles south of Berlin, when First Army troops met forward elements of the Russian Guards Division."
Information on back of photo reads: "If German divisions no longer retreat according to plan, part of their difficulties can be traced to the destruction of Deutsche Dunlop A.G. tire and rubber factory at Hanau, Germany, east of Frankfurt - a priority - one target for R.A.F. and the U.S. Eighth Air Force. When American Air Force observers surveyed the second most important rubber plant on the Continent, they found ruin and destruction widespread. Despite this the enemy's need for rubber products is so great, there was evidence of clearance and repair work to restore partial production, said surveyors. Elsewhere in Hanau the locomotive roundhouse had been destroyed by Allied air attacks. The town's gas works was a shambles. in the marshalling yard sidings and through lines were pocketed with bomb craters, some filled - in attempts to keep the rails open. In one typical Hanau attack last December, the Eighth sent 303 heavy bombers to drop in one-ton (U.S.) bombs, 1,112 one-thousand pounders, 176 five-hundreds, and 3,420 hundred-pound bombs."
Information on back of photo reads: "If German divisions no longer retreat according to plan, part of their difficulties can be traced to the destruction of Deutsche Dunlop A.G. tire and rubber factory at Hanau, Germany, east of Frankfurt - a priority - one target for R.A.F. and the U.S. Eighth Air Force. When American Air Force observers surveyed the second most important rubber plant on the Continent, they found ruin and destruction widespread. Despite this the enemy's need for rubber products is so great, there was evidence of clearance and repair work to restore partial production, said surveyors. Elsewhere in Hanau the locomotive roundhouse had been destroyed by Allied air attacks. The town's gas works was a shambles. in the marshalling yard sidings and through lines were pocketed with bomb craters, some filled - in attempts to keep the rails open. In one typical Hanau attack last December, the Eighth sent 303 heavy bombers to drop in one-ton (U.S.) bombs, 1,112 one-thousand pounders, 176 five-hundreds, and 3,420 hundred-pound bombs."
Information on back of photo reads: "3rd U.S. Army Troops go aboard LCVP prior to first crossing of the Rhine River by soldiers of the 3rd Army at Nierstein, Germany. Soldiers are members of the 5th Infantry Division."
A large port and industrial center that includied u-boat pens and oil refineries was bombed throughout the war. An air attack in July 1942 created one of the largest firestorms of WW II, killing 42,600 civilians, wounding 37,000 and practically destroying the city.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of what was left of the ancient quarter and entrance to Saalgasse after Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building after Germany was bombed during World War II.
Information with the photograph, "A lone soldier of the 100th Infantry Division, Seventh U.S. Army, walks through the ruins of Heilbronn, Germany, cleared of the enemy April 12, 1945. Forty miles southeast of Mannheim and the Rhino, Heilbronn, an important road and rail center was blasted by Allied Planes. U.S. Signal Corps Photo."
A lone soldier walks around the destroyed buildings in a German town towards the end of the war.
American GIs make their way through the rubble of what is left of a German town.
Tanks and soldiers traveled past destroyed buildings as they push through Germany in the spring of 1945.
Buildings in a German City bombed by the U.S. and RAF Forces, lay in ruins towards the end of the World War II.
Information included on back: "A wrecked 105mm gun stands by the side of a road near Manhay, Belgium, where troops of the 83rd U.S. Infantry Division are advancing against the northern flank of the Nazi wedge. Manhay was wrested from enemy control December 28, 1944, by Allied forces driving toward the German St. Vith-Laroche supply road which was severed in several places by January 8, 1945, when 15 miles of the vital highway was under U.S. and British control. The Germans were thus left with only one major supply highway into their salient." (U.S. Signal Corps).
Information included on back: "Two young women of captured Rittersdorf, Germany, step over an abandoned Nazi rifle as they carry water in the Reich town, seized by troops of the Third U.S. Army February 26, 1945. The town was cleared by American soldiers driving to Bitburg, last important German road center west of the Rhine in the Third Army battle sector."