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A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) image of a historic German structure, before the it was destroyed by Allied bombs during World War II.
A rambild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Augsburg building gutted by the Allied bombing during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building before Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of the destroyed theater after the Allied attacks during World War II
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building before Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building after Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Frankfurt area called Saalgasse before Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of what was left of the ancient quarter and entrance to Saalgasse after Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building before Germany was bombed during World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of a historic Munich building after Germany was bombed in World War II.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of the Stadion of Olympiade. This area was not badly damaged during the war, and was taken over in 1945 as the headquarters of the British military contingent in Berlin. Returned to German control in the mid-1990s, much of this area remains today as it did in 1936, still a sports center.
A raumbild-verlag (stereocard) of the Stadion of Olympiade, Hous of German sports. This area was not badly damaged during the war, and was taken over in 1945 as the headquarters of the British military contingent in Berlin. Returned to German control in the mid-1990s, much of this area remains today as it did in 1936, still a sports center.
Information on the back of the photgraph, "Visiting American newspaper and magazine men view rows of corpses of prisoners at the German concentration camp at Dachau. About 200 bodies were piled here."
Dachau opened in March 1933, and was the first concentration camp established by the Nazis in Germany. It served as a prototype and model for other Nazi concentration camps that followed. The prisoners in the photograph were mostly likely killed before the camp was liberated.
On April 29, 1945 Dachau was surrendered to the American Army by SS- Sturmscharfuhrer Heinrich Wicker. As U.S. troops neared the camp, they found more than 30 railroad cars filled with additional bodies brought to Dachau. Note the word "POLAK' is written on the chest of a dead Polish prisoner. Poles constituted the largest ethnic group in the Dachau camp during the war.
On April 29, 1945 Dachau was surrendered to the American Army by SS- Sturmscharfuhrer Heinrich Wicker. As U.S. troops neared the camp, they found more than 30 railroad cars filled with additional bodies brought to Dachau.
Over its twelve years as a concentration camp, the Dachau administration recorded the intake of 206,206 prisoners and 31,951 deaths. This number varies according to the source but the totals are overwhelming regardless. Photographic evidence of the Holocaust, such as this, extinguished claims that reports of horrific Nazi Death Camps was Allied propaganda.
The town of Dachau dates back to the Middle Ages and at one time was home to many of Germany's artists.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of all Allied Forces in the European Theater during World War II, is greeted by an unidentified officer. Eisenhower toured several Nazi Concentration Camps immediately after they were liberated in order to personally testify to the heinous Nazi war crimes.
Information with the photograph, "A lone soldier of the 100th Infantry Division, Seventh U.S. Army, walks through the ruins of Heilbronn, Germany, cleared of the enemy April 12, 1945. Forty miles southeast of Mannheim and the Rhino, Heilbronn, an important road and rail center was blasted by Allied Planes. U.S. Signal Corps Photo."
Building in back cente and right, is still burning as people carry what belongings they have left with them in the streets.
Information included with the photograph, "Troops of the Third U.S. Army crouch low as enemy fire opens during their crossings of the Rhine in assault boats at Oberwesel, Germany. The Army first forged the river March 22, 1945." Note the label "me" on the photograph most likely points to Raymond Young, infantryman and combat photographer.
Soldiers walk throughout the streets of Dachau. Buildings were demolished during bombings and the United States Army assaults, followed by the liberation of prisoners held in Dachau concentration camp.
Information included with the photograph,"Overall view showing the damage done by the RAF and the U.S. Eighth Air Force to the Deutsche Dunlop A.G. Tire and rubber factory at Hanau. The widespread destruction in this plant severely cut part of the German tire production for motor vehicles. This part of the plant ceased to produce after the last air attack that left it the mass of twisted girders and rubble shown." See the back of the original photograph for more information.