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John Hunt was one of the first African American to operate a restaurant in Morgantown, West Virginia. He opened a restaurant under the Commercial Hotel in 1892 located across from the courthouse on High Street. Information on p. 40 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler.
John Hunt was one of the first African American's to operate a restaurant in Morgantown, West Virginia. He opened a restaurant under the Commercial Hotel in 1892 located across from the courthouse on High Street. Information on p. 40 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler.
John Hunt was one of the first African American's to operate a restaurant in Morgantown, West Virginia. He opened a restaurant under the Commercial Hotel in 1892 located across from the courthouse on High Street. He also operated an Ice Cream Factory. Information on p. 40,99 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler.
John Hunt was an African American businessman who operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in Morgantown. He was one of the African American businessmen who became wealthy from enterprises in the service industry. The house was located between Colson Hall and Purinton House on West Virginia University's downtown campus. Information on p. 40,99, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler.
John Hunt owned and operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in the Morgantown area. Among the resorts was Indian Rocks. He bought the property in 1925. Information on p. 40,101, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler."
John Hunt was an African American businessman who operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in Morgantown. He opened Hunt's Oyster Parlor for Ladies at 127 Walnut Street. He was best known for his ice cream factory located on the corner of Hough Street and Beechurst Avenue. It was the first ice cream plant in Monongalia County. Information on p. 40,101, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler."
John Hunt was an African American businessman who operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in the Morgantown area. He operated a resort in Preston County called Indian Rocks. He bought the property in 1925. Information on p. 40,101, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler."
John Hunt was an African American businessman who operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in Morgantown. He was best known for his ice cream factory located on the corner of Hough Street and Beechurst Avenue. It was the first ice cream plant in Monongalia County. Hunt would cut ice from the Monongahela River and store it to make ice cream in the summer. Information on p. 40,101, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler.
Portrait of John Hunt at approximately age 19. Hunt would later own and operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in the Morgantown area. These included, Hunt's Ice Cream Parlor, Hunt's Oyster Parlor for Ladies and Indian Rocks Resort. Information on p. 40,101, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original Loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler."
John Hunt was an African American businessman who operated several resorts, hotels and eateries in Morgantown. Soon after opening his first restaurant he opened Hunt's Oyster Parlor for Ladies at 127 Walnut Street. His oysters were popular at weddings and festivals.  Information on p. 40,101, in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from the John H. Hunt family photos, held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Study Archive. Original loaned by Virginia Hunt Chandler."
James Edwards ran a sanitation business for the cities of Morgantown and Westover. He married Lucetta Dixon and the couple had six children. Information on p. 38 & 100 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Gwendolyn Edwards".
Sarah Edwards was the wife of John Edwards and the mother of James Edwards.  Information on p. 38 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Gwendolyn Edwards".
John Edwards ran the first water service in Morgantown. He married Sarah Jackson in 1865 and bought the land that he built his house on in 1877. It was originally 79 White Avenue. It is now 477 White Avenue. The house was demolished in 1989. Information on p. 35 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Gwendolyn Edwards".
James Edwards ran a sanitation business for the cities of Morgantown and Westover. He married Lucetta Dixon and the couple had six children. Information on p. 38,100 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Gwendolyn Edwards".
Prisilla "Aunt Prissy" Clark was a slave owned by George Dorsey of Monongalia County. When he died in 1824, his slaves were willed to his wife and children. Prisilla was given to Dorsey's son. It is unknown if she ever gained her freedom. Information on p. 22 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Reproduced from Spinster Club photo book, duplicate held by WVU Women's Centenary Project, Center for Women's Studies Archive. Original loaned by Ruth Lawrence Mahaney".
Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Charlene Marshall"
Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Ivry Moore Williams".
Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Ivry Moore Williams".
Boyd, wearing Army fatigues poses in front of mural labeled, "Atlantic Beach, S. C." Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Kitty Hughes".
The Ward family in Morgantown owned "The Hut", a popular restaurant for teenagers. This photograph was taken at St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. Information on p. 106 & 131 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Jack Ward Jr.".
Ward was the labor leader at Sterling Faucet, a Morgantown company that made plumbing fixtures. Information on p. 158 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Jack Ward Jr.".
Karen Ward (far left), Mary Ward (center) and Jack Ward Sr. (back). This photograph was taken at Mt. Herman Baptist Church. It replaced St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in 1991 after it was torn down. Information on p. 131, 163 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Jack Ward Jr.".
The house was located opposite St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. This church was replaced with the Mt. Herman Baptsit Church in 1991 after it was torn down. All persons in the photo are unidentified. Information on p. 131, 163 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Jack Ward Jr.".
Information on p. 134 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes, "Courtesy of Kitty Hughes".
Portrait of George Fleming in his army uniform, probably during World War II. Information on p. 143 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Robert Jackson".
Two older boys are probably wearing boy scout uniforms. Information on p. 150 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Robert Jackson".
Lawrence Jackson with a cigarette, standing in front of several neighborhood houses. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Bobbie Drew Ward".
The woman next to Dixon is thought to be his second wife, Alvie. They are Sarah Dixon Edwards' parents and James A. G. Edwards' in-laws. William Dixon contributed to an article titled "Negro Tales from West Virginia". Information on p. 94 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Gwendolyn Edwards".
The Edwards strolling along White Avenue. Information on p. 146 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Bobbie Drew Ward".
Inscription on the photograph, "Lovingly, Aileen". Information on p. 147 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Robert Jackson".
Baby portrait of Norris Finney. Information on p. 148 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Kitty Hughes".
Norris Finney poses with two small boys, unidentified, but are most likely his sons. Information on p. 150 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Kitty Hughes".
Information on p. 148 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Bobbie Drew Ward".
Information on p. 148 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Bobbie Drew Ward".
From left to right: Unidentified female, Naomi Butler, Edna Cranford, and Naomi Dixon. Information on p. 147 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Bobbie Drew Ward".
Eugene Holland in his U. S. Navy uniform. Information on p. 143 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Ivry Moore Williams".
Robert Church wearing Army fatigues, operating a crane while serving in Korea. Information on p. 143 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Roberta Barbra Church".
Muriel Dooms was the daughter of Eugene "Eddie" Dooms and Leiugania Richardson. Information on p. 105 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Robert Jackson".
L to R: Ruth Barnett, Lennie Wiley,and Annette Chandler Broome. In 1957, Annette Broome was the first known African American woman to receive an undergraduate degree from West Virginia University. She was the granddaughter of John Hunt. Information on p. 161 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Charlene Marshall".
A young Air Force Cadet at West Virginia University, asked Dorothy Johnson to dance the jitterbug with him at Hotel Morgan during a holiday dance. Johnson was an elevator operator at the hotel. Dean Arnold, the dean of women at the University, asked the cadet's commanding officer to dismiss him. Information on p. 131 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Robert Jackson".
St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) was one of the first two African-American churches in Morgantown. Information on p. 131 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Jack Ward Jr.".
All persons are unidentified. Information on p. 136 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Ivry Moore Williams".
Back Row Seated L to R : Bula Cobbs, Clavette Blue, Gertrude Viney. Front Row: Helen Stevens, Nettie Parker, Pricilla Blue. Clockwise Flavia Holland, Mabel Cloe, Jackie Cranford and Corrine Edwards. Information on p. 137 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Ivry Moore Williams".
Colonel Ed Jones in uniform. Written on the photo: "To Mother my Princess, Your Son." Information on p. 143 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Jack Ward Jr.".
An unidentified bellhop working at the Hotel Morgan. Information on p. 149 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Bobbie Drew Ward".
This is a photograph of Bill Mosby, Betty Parsons, and Jack Ward Jr.  Information on p. 129 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Charlene Marshall".
Outside photograph of a young Bill Mosby. Information on p. 129 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Charlene Marshall".
L to R: Mary Lou Mosby, Anna Mae Henderson and Christine Mosby. Information on p. 128 in "Our Monongalia" by Connie Park Rice. Information with the photograph includes "Courtesy of Ivry Moore Williams".